Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Brownfield Ag News
Subscribe To This Feed

GAO: Climate change impact on flood and crop ins.


Programs iconA government report on the impact of climate change says increased losses in taxpayer-funded flood and crop insurance programs could be substantial in the coming decades.

The Government Accountability Office, GAO, also examined how public insurers are preparing for climate change and resulting challenges.

The GAO reviewed 20 studies, looked at federal and private sector data and interviewed agency officials.

It recommends the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, and the USDA’s Risk Management Agency, RMA, take more steps “to encourage flood and crop insurance policyholders to adopt building and agricultural practices that reduce long-term risk and federal exposure to losses.”

The GAO says FEMA agreed with the recommendation while the RMA neither agreed nor disagreed with it.

 

The post GAO: Climate change impact on flood and crop ins. appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

More cold weather ahead for the Heartland


A brief period of weekend warmth will come to an end early next week across the Rockies, Plains, Midwest, and mid-South. Later next week, cold weather will become re-established in all areas of the U.S., except from California into the Desert Southwest. Meanwhile, weekend rainfall will become widespread along and east of a line from the southeastern Plains to the upper Great Lakes region. Widespread totals of 1 to 2 inches can be expected, with 2- to 4-inch amounts possible across the lower Southeast. By Sunday, snow showers will return to the upper Midwest, followed by a new round of snow squalls in the Great Lakes region early next week. Elsewhere, mostly dry weather will prevail from southern California to the central and southern High Plains, but 5-day precipitation totals could reach 2 to 4 inches in the northern Rockies and 4 to 8 inches in parts of the Pacific Northwest.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures in most areas from the Rockies to the East Coast, while warmer-than-normal weather will be confined to the Far West. Meanwhile, near- to below-normal precipitation across the majority of the U.S. will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions across the nation’s northern tier from Montana to Michigan.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

 

The post More cold weather ahead for the Heartland appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Winter-like pattern hold across the Corn Belt


Across the Corn Belt, snow squalls are subsiding downwind of the Great Lakes, but cold conditions persist throughout the region. Sub-zero temperatures were noted Friday morning in the upper Mississippi Valley, maintaining stress on livestock. Snow on the ground continues to hamper late-season harvest activities across the northern Corn Belt and parts of the Ohio Valley.

On the Plains, temperatures are rebounding to near- or above-normal levels. Friday’s high temperatures could reach 50° as far north as Montana. Meanwhile, some light rain is falling across the southeastern Plains, including parts of eastern Oklahoma.

In the South, light rain is spreading from the western Gulf Coast region into the northern Mississippi Delta. Farther east, cool, dry weather favors autumn fieldwork, including cotton and soybean harvesting.

In the West, dry weather prevails, except for a few showers in southern California and the Pacific Northwest. Mild, breezy conditions are developing in some areas in advance of a Pacific storm, although air stagnation remains a concern for some valley locations across the interior Northwest.

Morning Low Temperature Plot

Weather Alerts

Forecast High Temperatures (National)

 

The post Winter-like pattern hold across the Corn Belt appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Many factors to consider when making farm program decisions


ag outlook meeting-beatrice 11-17-14

Brad Lubben, Extension policy specialist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is one of several farm bill experts around the country who are helping farmers understand and analyze their options with the new federal commodity programs. At a recent ag outlook meeting in Beatrice, Nebraska, we visited with Lubben about the many factors that farmers need to consider before making their decisions.

AUDIO: Brad Lubben

The post Many factors to consider when making farm program decisions appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

No end in sight for strong calf prices


cattle grazing-keya paha county 6-13You’ve probably heard the old saying, “The cure for high prices is high prices”. It usually holds true.  But that adage may not apply to high calf prices this time around, says Gary Brester, a livestock economist from Montana State University.

“I just don’t see these calf prices going down appreciably,” Brester says. “Certainly record prices don’t last forever. But I don’t think we’re going to see $1.50 calves anymore. I think kind of that $2.00 range might be what we’re looking at, for quite a long time.”

We talked to Brester at the recent American Bankers Association National Ag Bankers Conference in Omaha.

AUDIO: Gary Brester

The post No end in sight for strong calf prices appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Wisconsin farmer to lead U.S.F.R.A


Kavazanjian

Nancy Kavazanjian of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin has been elected chair of the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance.  USFRA consists of more than 80 farmer and rancher-led organizations working to build consumer trust in the way American agriculture produces food. In just a little more than three years in existence, the group has developed some valuable tools for communicating with consumers including Food Dialog programs where farmers talk about their farming experiences.  The organization just announced the second “Faces of Farming” class: Thomas Titus of Illinois, Erin Brenneman of Iowa, Carla Wardin of Michigan, Jay Hill of New Mexico, and Darrell Glaser of Texas who will travel the country to tell their story of farming to consumers.

USFRA also produced the feature film “Farmland”. Kavazanjian says it is now available to download and their goal is to get that video into every high school in the country. They are also going to offer a series of shorter features on their website in the near future.

Kavazanjian represents the U.S. Soybean Board in the organization, she is also an active member of the Wisconsin Corn Growers Association and Wisconsin Women in Agriculture. She and her family operate Hammer & Kavazanjian Farms.

Kavazanjian talks about the effort:

Read more about USFRA here:

The post Wisconsin farmer to lead U.S.F.R.A appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Cheese falls


Barrel cheese prices dropped on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange on Thursday, down 16.5 cents to $1.75 per pound. Blocks lost another 2.5 cents to close at $1.775.  Blocks have declined 16.75 cents for the week.  Ironically, Class III futures increased, November up 15 cents, December gained 14 cents.

 

National Dairy Products Sales Report for the week ending November 15; cheddar cheese blocks averaged $2.21 down 0.7 cents from the previous week. Barrels increased 5.9 cents to average $2.15 per pound.  Butter increased 3.5 cents to $2.00, nonfat dry milk decreased 2.2 cents to average $1.44 and dry whey decreased 0.4 cents to 64.2 cents per pound.

 

The Class I advanced prices for December: Base Class I Price is $22.53 per hundredweight, down $1.53 from the previous month. The Base Skim Milk Price for Class I for December $15.39 per hundredweight up $2.14 from the previous month.  This the lowest Base Class I price since February and the highest Base Skim price since June.

 

USDA reports 252,000 dairy cows were slaughtered under federal inspection in October, 14,000 more than in September and 25,000 less than went to slaughter in October of 2013. Year-to-date dairy cow slaughter totals 2.34 million head compared to 2.6 million for the same period a year ago.

The post Cheese falls appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Armed to Farm: Meet Military Veterans Ag Liaison


Karus GutterThe United States Department of Agriculture has a new position — Military Veterans Agricultural Liaison.

Karis Gutter is Deputy Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services and is taking on the additional role of MVA liaison, “As a Marine who served for more than six years, I clearly understand a number of the unique challenges that our veterans face transitioning from a theater or non-theater to civilian activities. One of the things that we absolutely want to do is encourage careers and professions in agriculture and farming.”

Gutter – a Mississippi native – tells Brownfield Ag News he will work with farm/veteran groups and related federal agencies, “All of those federal executive branch agencies provide resources and benefits but they may not be as skilled and as versed in agriculture as USDA. So what we’re going to do is bring all the resources of USDA to bear to make sure that we’re absolutely providing maximum resource and opportunity to our veterans.”

He says agriculture needs veterans, “When you look at the challenge that we have with access to food we’re going to need to recruit new and beginning farm and ranch resources throughout the world to help us keep pace with population growth. And, the veteran’s cadre is a critical component of that challenge in meeting those demands for USDA.”

The new position was created by the 2014 Farm Bill.

AUDIO:  Interview with Karis Gutter (8:30 mp3):

USDA – Veterans Outreach

The post Armed to Farm: Meet Military Veterans Ag Liaison appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Thanksgiving dinner up by 4 cents per person


The cost of Thanksgiving dinner is higher than last year, but just a little.  The annual American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) survey indicates that the meal will cost $49.41.  That’s 37 cents more than in 2013.  But Farm Bureau economist John Anderson points out that the cost is for a meal to serve ten people.

“That works out to about $4.94 a serving,” said Anderson, in an interview provided by the AFBF, “so, very affordable.”

The meal’s traditional centerpiece, a 16-pound turkey, came in at $21.65 this year, which is 11 cents less than last year.  Turkey production is less this year, which has actually boosted wholesale prices for the birds, but stores often offer turkey’s at a lower price as a loss leader to attract shoppers who may purchase the rest of their groceries there.

Foods showing the largest increases this year are sweet potatoes, pumpkin pie mix and, said Anderson, dairy products.

“That’s really not too much of a surprise,” said Anderson.  “Dairy product prices, for the most part, have been up at the retail level for most of this year, and so our survey is really confirming information that’s consistent with what we’ve seen all year long.”

In addition to the turkey, other items that declined in price include bread stuffing, cranberries, pie shells and brown-n-serve rolls. The annual Farm Bureau shopping list includes what’s traditionally served at Thanksgiving, including plenty of leftovers.

The post Thanksgiving dinner up by 4 cents per person appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Solid demand supports soybeans, corn


Markets Featured Image 600x500_edited-2

Soybeans were higher on fund and commercial buying. Unknown bought another 140,000 tons of 2014/15 U.S. beans and the weekly numbers were bullish. U.S. soybean sales and shipments are at 79% of USDA’s projection for the marketing year. There were a lot of 2014/15 sales late last marketing year, but that’s still pretty impressive, especially considering the current marketing year isn’t even three months old. Soybean meal and oil were higher, following beans.

Corn was higher on fund and commercial buying. Unknown picked up 101,600 tons of 2014/15 U.S. corn, but while weekly sales were good, it was another slow week for shipments. The trade’s also watching the weather and its impact on the tail end of this year’s harvest. Ethanol futures were higher. Ethanol production for the week ending November 14 averaged 970,000 barrels per day, up 7.3% on the year, and stocks were 17.335 million barrels, down nearly 15% from a year ago.

The wheat complex was higher on fund and commercial buying. It’s still cold and snowy around the Great Lakes, but Southwestern winter wheat areas are seeing more seasonal conditions. Past that – weekly export numbers were bearish. Still, the trade’s watching weather issues in Russia and Australia, and U.S. exports could get propped up by the superior quality. Japan did buy 72,600 tons of U.S. food wheat, along with 28,600 tons from Australia and 22,000 tons from Canada, and Taiwan picked up 82,100 tons of U.S. milling wheat. Saudi Arabia is tendering for 12.5% protein hard wheat.

The post Solid demand supports soybeans, corn appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Relieving livestock pain involves first assessing it


Hans Coetzee of Iowa State University talks about relieving pain in livestock at the VISION event in Kansas City, Nov. 11, 2014.With a growing demand for improved animal welfare, the search is on for livestock pain relief.  There are no FDA approved drugs to relieve pain in livestock.  Hans Coetzee at Iowa State University is in search of one, but at the same time, is searching for a means to determine whether a compound is effective.

“Consumers are concerned about how livestock are produced and one of the areas of concern has been painful procedures and the impact this might have on the animal, and so I think it’s very important for us in production agriculture to try to find drugs that are effective in alleviating pain,” Coetzee told Brownfield Ag News.  “In order to do that we need to find ways to be able to assess or measure that pain.”

Coetzee tells Brownfield that cattle are what he refers to as a stoic species that doesn’t outwardly show that they’re in pain.  Scientists instead read subtle physiological changes that indicate stress from pain.  Coetzee was part an animal welfare panel discussion recently in Kansas City.

AUDIO: Hans Coetzee (4 min. MP3)

The post Relieving livestock pain involves first assessing it appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Pork and beef values end higher


Cattle country remained untested on Thursday afternoon with just a few scattered bids reported in Kansas from 167.00 to 168.00 live, and Nebraska 263.00 to 265.00 dressed basis. Asking prices remain firm around 174.00 in the South and 270.00 plus in the North. Significant trade volume will be delayed until sometime on Friday, probably not until after the release of the monthly cattle on feed report. The kill was estimated at 113,000 cattle, the same as last week, but down 9,000 from last year.

Boxed beef cutout values were firm to higher on moderate demand and light offerings. Choice beef was up .60 at 255.39, and select was .94 higher at 242.99.

Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle contracts settled 57 points lower to 100 higher with nearby December and February contracts holding onto light pressure due to the weakness through the rest of the livestock market. Gains developed in the deferred futures trade, and this helped to firm longer term support in the complex, although trade volume remained light. December settled .57 lower at 170.25, and February was down .47 at 171.82.

Feeder cattle ended the session 12 to 197 points lower as contracts came under significant pressure with the strongest losses seen in the early 2015 contracts. Traders appeared to start to adjust to expectations of the cattle on feed report due for release Friday afternoon. Although estimates point to a light decrease in cattle placements in October, traders may have taken additional protection. November settled .12 lower at 240.42, and January was down 1.52 at 235.57.

Feeder cattle receipts at the Huss Platte Valley Auction in Nebraska totaled 4583 head on Wednesday. Compared to last week, steers under 650 pounds sold 7.00 to 10.00 higher, over 650 pounds steady to 3.00 higher. Heifers under 600 pounds sold 4.00 to 8.00 higher with weights over 600 pounds fully steady. Demand was good throughout the day with several buyers in the seats. Feeder steers medium and large 1, calves weighing 716 pounds averaged 242.83 per hundredweight. 719 pound heifers brought 231.97.

Lean hogs settled 100 points lower to 65 higher. The nearby contracts closed under pressure, but light buyer support entered the market and supported the deferred contracts. The nearby issues ended well off session lows and that kept buyers focused on the potential that current demand fears have been adequately met by the pullback in price levels. December settled 1.00 lower at 90.77, and February was down .75 at 90.00.

There was slow hog market activity with light demand. Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade closed .66 lower at 85.79 weighted average on a carcass basis, the West was down .68 at 85.75, and the East was .17 higher at 84.04. Missouri direct base carcass meat price closed steady from 77.00 to 81.00. Midwest hogs were fully steady from 58.00 to 66.00 on a live basis.

The pork carcass cutout value was .98 higher at 93.62 FOB plant. Picnics, loins, and bellies ended higher.

For the week ending Nov. 15, Iowa barrows and gilts averaged 284.7 pounds, a full pound lighter than the previous week and only 3.5 pounds greater than 2013 the smallest year over year premium since late September 2013. 

Thursday’s hog kill was estimated at 430,000 head, 2,000 less than last week, and down 6,000 from last year.

 

The post Pork and beef values end higher appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Vilsack on National Rural Health Day


Programs iconU.S. Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack says it’s a good day to celebrate National Rural Health Day, “As a result of the passage of the Affordable Care Act, we are seeing a reduction in the level of uninsured people in rural America.”

And, he says there are other benefits, “Now, 3,500 people throughout rural America providing extended health care services as a result of the Affordable Care Act. We’ve also seen more competition for our insurance business.”

Vilsack says one in five uninsured Americans lives in a rural area – and, rural residents have higher rates of chronic conditions that can be made worse by a lack of doctors or clinics in rural areas.

Open enrollment began for the Health Insurance Marketplace began November 15th and runs through February 15th, 2015. Go to www.healthcare.gov

or call toll-free (1-800-318-2596).

The post Vilsack on National Rural Health Day appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Red meat production down 4% on year


 

meatcase

According to USDA, commercial red meat production during October 2014 was 4.319 billion pounds, 4% below October 2013.

Beef came out at 2.172 billion pounds, 6% less than last year, with the kill down 9% at 2.641 million head and average live weight up 28 pounds to 1,355 pounds.

Pork was reported at 2.127 billion pounds, 2% lower than a year ago, with the slaughter declining 4% to 9.953 million head and average live weight gaining eight pounds at 286 pounds.

Lamb and mutton production was pegged at 13.4 million pounds, a 2% increase, with the kill slightly lower at 207,700 head and average live weight three pounds higher at 129 pounds.

So far this year, 2014 U.S. red meat production is 39.451 billion pounds, down 4% from this time last year.

 

The post Red meat production down 4% on year appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: November 20, 2014


Markets Featured Image 600x500_edited-2

Dec. corn closed at $3.7 and 1/4, up 10 cents
Jan. soybeans closed at $10.20 and 1/2, up 15 and 3/4 cents
Dec. soybean meal closed at $370.80, up 40 cents
Dec. soybean oil closed at 32.67, up 16 points
Dec. wheat closed at $5.47 and 1/4, up 9 and 1/2 cents
Dec. live cattle closed at $170.25, down 57 cents
Dec. lean hogs closed at $90.77, down $1.00
Nov. crude oil closed at $75.58, up $1.00
Dec. cotton closed at 58.54, down 57 points
Dec. Class III milk closed at $18.69, up 14 cents
Dec. gold closed at $1,190.90, down $3.00
Dow Jones Industrial Average: 17,719.00, up 33.27 points

The post Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: November 20, 2014 appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Take advantage of educational sessions


ARC_PLC_Spotlight_image

There is a lot of information to digest about the new safety net programs available to farmers.

Stu Ellis, farm bill educator with the University of Illinois says farmers should really take advantage of the educational programs being offered by Extension and the Farm Service Agency.  “When you look at making a farm bill choice you can be overwhelmed with questions of how to do it,” he says.  “With the tools provided by Texas A&M and the University of Illinois there are web-based decision aids that allow people to enter their information and get some very good recommendations on what they should be thinking about as far as signing up for the farm bill.”

Ellis tells Brownfield now is the time to figure out which safety net option – the Agricultural Risk Coverage or Price Loss Coverage – will best fit your farm.

The post Take advantage of educational sessions appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Fuel Up to Play 60 endorsed by Indiana DOE


IMG_9889

The Fuel Up to Play 60 program gets a big endorsement in Indiana.  Earlier this week the Indiana Department of Education named Fuel Up to Play 60 the top in-school health and wellness program in the state.

Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz says the partnership between the Department of Education, Indiana Dairy and the Fuel Up to Play 60 program is a great way for student to exercise outside of school.  “We can get kids excited and educators can get on board and feel like there are support systems to make it happy,” she says.  “It’s just a good partnership to really get kids going where they need to go with wellness.”

Glenda Ritz, Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction

Fuel Up to Play 60 Ambassador, Indianapolis Colts punter Pat McAfee says he’s thrilled to be part of the program and that the Department of Education has endorsed it.  “We’re kind of in an age where kids aren’t really doing much anymore,” he says.  “Anytime we can motivate them to drink milk and be healthy and get active – it’s the least we can do and I’m excited to do it.”

Pat McAfee, Indianapolis Colts

The Fuel Up to Play 60 program is sponsored by the National Dairy Council and the National Football League.

Deb Osza, American Dairy Association of Indiana

The post Fuel Up to Play 60 endorsed by Indiana DOE appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Thursday midday cash livestock prices


Cattle country is quiet again on Thursday, but the expectation is packer inquiry will start to improve as the day progresses. However, it is possible significant trade volume could be delayed until Friday after the release of the monthly cattle on feed report. Asking prices are around 174.00 in the South, and 270.00 plus in the North.

Boxed beef cutouts were higher in the morning report, Choice beef was up .84 at 255.63, and select was 1.58 higher at 243.63.

Feeder cattle receipts at the Huss Platte Valley Auction in Nebraska totaled 4583 head on Wednesday. Compared to last week, steers under 650 pounds sold 7.00 to 10.00 higher, over 650 pounds steady to 3.00 higher. Heifers under 600 pounds sold 4.00 to 8.00 higher with weights over 600 pounds fully steady. Demand was good throughout the day with several buyers in the seats. Feeder steers medium and large 1, calves weighing 716 pounds averaged 242.83 per hundredweight. 719 pound heifers brought 231.97.

Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota, and Western direct trade are not reported due to confidentiality. Nationally the barrows and gilts are 1.50 lower with a weighted average of 84.14 on a carcass basis. Eastern hogs are .07 higher at 83.94. The Missouri direct base carcass meat price was steady from 77.00 to 81.00. Midwest hogs on a live basis are fully steady from 58.00 to 66.00.

The pork carcass cutout value was up .49 in the morning report 93.13 FOB plant. Belly, picnic, and loins were higher.

For the week ending Nov. 15, Iowa barrows and gilts averaged 284.7 pounds, a full pound lighter than the previous week and only 3.5 pounds greater than 2013 the smallest year over year premium since late September 2013.

 

The post Thursday midday cash livestock prices appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Soybean sales hit marketing year low


 

Healthy Living Icon

USDA reports corn and soybean meal sales for the week ending November 13 were larger than expected, while wheat and soybean meal were within the anticipated range and soybeans fell below all estimates. Physical shipments of soybeans were above what’s needed weekly to meet USDA projections for the 2014/15 marketing year, but corn and wheat were both short of their respective marks.

Wheat came out at 361,700 tons (13.3 million bushels), down 13% from the week ending November 6, but up 1% from the five year average. Unknown destinations purchased 130,500 tons and the Philippines bought 52,300 tons. At this point in the 2014/15 marketing year, wheat sales are 594.6 million bushels, compared to 801.5 million in 2013/14.

Corn was reported at 908,700 tons (35.8 million bushels), 80% higher than the previous week and 45% more than the four week average. Japan picked up 447,500 tons and Mexico purchased 159,600 tons. So far this marketing year, corn sales are 812.3 million bushels, compared to 941.9 million this time last year.

Soybeans were a new marketing year low at 483,000 tons (17.7 million bushels). That’s 55% lower than the week before and 68% less than the four week average. China bought 532,900 tons and Spain picked up 131,500 tons, but unknown destinations canceled on 657,600 tons. For the marketing year to date, soybean sales are 1.367 billion bushels, compared to 1.297 billion a year ago. Sales of 4,500 tons (200,000 bushels) for 2015/16 delivery were to Japan.

Soybean meal was pegged at 265,700 tons, considerably larger than both the prior week and the four week average. Cuba purchased 66,000 tons and unknown destinations bought 41,100 tons. Cumulative soybean meal sales for the current marketing year are 6,556,700 tons, compared to 5,360,700 last year.

Soybean oil came out at 19,600 tons, an increase of 26% from the previous week and 40% more than the four week average. Mexico picked up 5,600 tons and Nicaragua bought 3,800 tons. 2014/15 soybean oil sales are 287,100 tons, compared to 248,100 in 2013/14.

Net beef sales totaled 13,500 tons, up 69% on the week and 26% higher than the four week average. The listed purchasers were Hong Kong (7,400 tons), Japan (2,000 tons), Canada (1,300 tons), South Korea (1,200 tons), and Mexico (1,100 tons). Sales of 3,700 tons for 2015 delivery were mainly to Hong Kong (3,000 tons), Japan (300 tons), and South Korea (300 tons).

Net pork sales totaled 14,200 tons, down 2% from the week before and 24% lower than the four week average. The reported buyers were Mexico (5,600 tons), Japan (4,000 tons), South Korea (1,300 tons), Canada (1,200 tons), and Hong Kong (600 tons). Sales of 1,300 tons for 2015 delivery were primarily to South Korea (700 tons) and Hong Kong (600 tons).

 

The post Soybean sales hit marketing year low appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Students learn about Nebraska agriculture


ag sack lunch 11-14Fourth-graders from Lincoln’s Cathedral School learned more about where their food comes from Wednesday during an Ag Sack Lunch presentation in Lincoln.

The program offers students who are visiting the state capitol on school field trips a free sack lunch featuring foods produced in Nebraska.  While they eat their lunch, college-age “Ag Ambassadors” visit with them about agriculture.

Afterwards, we asked some of the fourth-graders what they learned.

AUDIO: Students from Lincoln’s Cathedral School

Ag Ambassador Emma Liekens likes sharing the story of Nebraska agriculture “and some of the rural values that not everybody knows about if you didn’t grow up around it.”

Ambassador Emily Long enjoys helping students make the connection between the food they eat and Nebraska farmers and ranchers.

“I love seeing how much they do learn when they come up to us—the look on their faces after we tell them something, like some really fact about agriculture,” Long says. “You can just see the appreciation growing in them for Nebraska agriculture. I think that’s really cool.”

AUDIO: Emma Liekens and Emily Long

The Ag Sack Lunch program is sponsored by the Nebraska Soybean Board, Nebraska Corn Board and Nebraska Pork Producers Association.

Photo: Emma Liekens (left) and Emily Long discuss Nebraska agriculture with fourth-graders from Lincoln’s Cathedral of the Risen Christ School

The post Students learn about Nebraska agriculture appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Weather

Events

Poll
What would you like to see added to our website?
Nothing! It's perfect!
OTHER (Add response in the comments)
Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)
Name:
Email:
Your email address is never published.
View Results

Tri-County Broadcasting

 

LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services