Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Brownfield Ag News
Subscribe To This Feed

One risk management plan does not fit all


A dairy futures broker says all dairies need a risk management plan.  But a single plan does not suit every operation.  In hindsight, Ryan Yonkman, with the Chicago-based futures brokerage firm Rice Dairy, says Margin Protection Program sign-up was a good idea.  He adds that faltering dairy markets this year may convince a greater number of producers to use the program in coming years.  Yonkman, who grew up on a Michigan dairy farm, spoke at the Heart of America Dairy Expo and has some specific advice about how dairymen might approach risk protection, with or without the government program.

AUDIO: Ryan Yonkman (3 min. MP3)

The post One risk management plan does not fit all appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Think and breathe with the horse


Mark Rashid is an author, singer and horse trainer. His horse training method is to get the horse to think and then get the rider to think like the horse…and breathe.  Mark talks about his method.

Visit Mark’s website here:

 

The post Think and breathe with the horse appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

NFO members determine policy positions


The National Farmers Organization wrapped-up their annual meeting in Nashville on Friday. Members re-affirmed their support for Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) and the U.S. Trade Representative’s appeal of the latest WTO ruling.  Members also favor the elimination of the trade embargo on Cuba.

While the organization strongly supports free trade, they oppose Fast Track Authority for the President saying Congress should have some input on such deals.

The NFO is in favor of GMO labeling saying consumers have the right to know where and how their food is grown and processed.

NFO Policy Analyst Gene Paul talks about the issues:

The post NFO members determine policy positions appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Wisconsin groups want Congressional action on gray wolf


gray wolf

A collection of farm and other groups called “The Wisconsin Coalition to Delist Gray Wolves” is asking Congressman Reid Ribble (WI-R) to help remove the gray wolf from the Endangered Species List.

Last month a U.S. District Judge overturned a U.S. Fish and Wildlife order which delisted the gray wolf in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan in 2011. The Judge put the wolf back on the List and halted all hunting and other control of the wolves.

Citing the resurgence of the wolf and the increasing livestock losses; the coalition is asking Representative Ribble to lead Congressional action to federally reinstate the Fish and Wildlife order and remove the wolf from the Endangered Species List permanently.

Members of the coalition include the Wisconsin Farm Bureau, Wisconsin Farmers Union, National Farmers Organization, Professional Dairy Producers, Dairy Business Association, Wisconsin Pork Producers, Wisconsin Cattlemen’s Association, Wisconsin Corn Growers, Wisconsin Soybean Association and others.

 

 

 

The post Wisconsin groups want Congressional action on gray wolf appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Pretty good week in the dairy markets


Dairy markets closed a little higher on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange on Friday. Cash cheese blocks gained a penny, butter held steady, nonfat dry milk increased 2.25 cents and all of the Class III futures contracts for 2015 gained.

For the week: cash cheese barrels are down a half-cent, blocks are a penny higher, butter is unchanged and nonfat dry milk gained 3.25 cents. The February Class III contract increased 55 cents, March up 62 cents, April added 69 cents and July was unchanged.

The Base Class I price for February milk is $16.24 down $2.34 from the previous month. Base Skim Milk Price for Class I for February is $10.76 down 59 cents from the previous month.

Milk production is steady to slightly higher across the country with plants running at or near capacity. Cheese inventories are trending higher thanks to milk intakes, slim exports and buyers reluctant to pull-the-trigger as they wait to see if prices will go lower.  The December milk production report about as expected: milk production, cow numbers and production per cow were all higher for the month, the quarter and the year.  In fact the December production per cow was a record for December.

HighGround Dairy along with other analysts project milk prices will continue to decline to a bottom in May and then rebound. Expectations are the low milk prices and high cull-cow prices will prompt dairy producers to start reducing herds shortly.

The post Pretty good week in the dairy markets appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Limit losses in cattle futures


Feedlot country was quiet on Friday afternoon with both sides shocked by the limit losses throughout the live and feeder futures. However, packers remain short bought and some late afternoon trade was expected following the cattle on feed report. Nominal asking prices were around 162.00 plus in the South and 260.00 plus in the North. The weekly cattle kill was estimated at 576,000 head, 30,000 greater than last week, but 24,000 less than 2014.

Boxed beef cutout values were lower on light to moderate demand and moderate offerings. Choice beef was down 1.91 at 253.74, and select was 1.66 lower at 247.28.

Total cattle on feed on January 1 was up one percent from a year ago, marketing’s were down five percent and placements into feedlots were down eight percent on the year. A complete report on cattle on feed can be found in the news section of our web site.

Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle contracts settled 215 to 300 points lower. The focus on potentially higher cattle on feed numbers ahead of the monthly report after the close of trade had many traders taking extra protection. The lackluster fundamentals continued to limit buyer support at the end of the week. February settled at 150.35, and April at 148.80 both the 3.00 limit lower.

Feeder cattle contracts were locked limit down in most contract months on uncertainty ahead of the cattle on feed report as well as aggressive limit down losses in the live cattle futures. Traders were unwilling to step back into the market given the aggressive weak tone developing in the complex. The limit down move in the March futures would open the door to expanded trade limits on Monday, which could add even more volatility as traders trade the result of the cattle on feed report. January settled 2.27 lower at 213.70, and March was the 4.50 limit lower at 201.87.

Feeder cattle receipts a Missouri auctions totaled 47,906 head this week. Compared to last week, feeder steers and heifers sold mostly 5.00 to 15.00 lower. A few cases of closer to steady money were noted mostly on lighter weight cattle, which would be suitable for grass in the coming months. This however was the exception, as the majority of cattle sold at lower levels. Heavy weight cattle, which have fewer days left before finishing, felt the most pressure as futures markets continued a downward slide. Feeder steers, medium and large 1 averaging 621 pounds brought 248.64 per hundredweight. 624 pound heifers averaged 219.83.

Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade closed .06 lower at 69.04 weighted average on a carcass basis, the West was down .16 at68.94, and the East was 1.72 lower at 66.22. Missouri direct base carcass meat price was steady from 62.00 to 65.00.

Lean hogs settled 207 to 280 points lower as strong pressure held through the entire livestock market, and this included hog futures markets. The combination of sharp losses in cattle futures and weak pork values created a lack of interest of buyers stepping into the market from the sidelines. February settled 2.30 lower at 69.30, and April down 2.22 at 70.65.

The pork carcass cutout value was .32 lower at 84.38 FOB plant with only hams higher.

The weekly hog slaughter at 2,316,000 head is 59,000 more than last week and 102,000 greater than 2014.

 

The post Limit losses in cattle futures appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Export sales support corn


 

Futures Markets copy

Soybeans were lower on fund and technical selling. Weekly export sales were a new marketing year low after a couple of big cancellations. Past that – the trade’s watching weather in South America with more rain headed for central Brazil. Agroconsult projects Brazil’s crop at 93.9 million tons, down from their previous guess. Soybean meal was higher and bean oil was lower on the adjustment of product spreads.

Corn was higher on fund and technical buying. Weekly export sales were a new marketing year high, but it was yet another slow week for shipments. Still, 86 million bushels is an impressive amount of corn and the slow-down in bean sales could help corn. Ethanol futures were higher.

The wheat complex was mixed with Chicago and Kansas City lower on fund and technical selling, along with the higher dollar. Minneapolis was up fractionally. Weekly wheat export numbers were bearish and there was no fresh news. It’s expected to be a warm weekend in many U.S. winter wheat growing areas. The European Union issued export licenses on 728,000 tons of soft wheat.

 

The post Export sales support corn appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota land prices


Programs ICONFarm Credit Services of America says cropland prices in Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming declined somewhat in 2014 but demand remained strong for pastureland.

FCS America tracks sales records every January and July – and its 64 benchmark farms in the four state area.

Cropland prices in the last six months of 2014 fell 7.1 percent in Iowa; 4.8 percent in Nebraska; and 4.6 percent in South Dakota.

Strong livestock prices increased demand for pastureland in each of the four states: Prices for pastureland rose 2/10ths of one-percent in Iowa; 1.7 percent in Wyoming; nearly 5 percent in South Dakota; and, nearly 6 percent in Nebraska.

Farmland prices remain nearly 200 to 300 percent higher in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota, compared to 10 years ago.

The post Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota land prices appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Deere & Company layoffs in Iowa/Illinois


Homepage_2013_Western_Farm_Show_John_Deere

More than 900 workers at John Deere ag equipment plants in Iowa and Illinois are being laid off indefinitely. The Moline, Illinois company is giving notice to 560 workers at three locations in Waterloo, Iowa, 300 at the Des Moines Works Plant in Ankeny, Iowa and 45 employees of Harvester Works in East Moline, Illinois.

Deere officials say the decision reflects the economic forecast in the company’s November 2014 earnings report.

The layoffs will take place from February through late March.

Also, about 500 employees at Deere’s Seeding and Cylinder facility in Moline, Illinois will go on an “extended inventory adjustment shutdown.” The company says a seasonal adjustment is typical for that location this time of year.

On the hiring side, Deere has added 110 new jobs at its construction and forestry factories in Dubuque and Davenport, Iowa.

~Thanks to Radio Iowa

The post Deere & Company layoffs in Iowa/Illinois appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Missouri Ag Bill advances


Missouri Capitol Building_EDIT

The Missouri Senate Agriculture committee has advanced a broad reaching agriculture bill this week.

Committee chair Brian Munzlinger says it contains the important dairy provision to help grow the state’s dairy industry but does not contain the deer provision – the reason for Governor Jay Nixon’s veto of the bill last year, “I hope that we can fast-track this bill and that it gets through. Even if it gets through the Senate as the first bill through, hopefully it gets through the House also.”

Munzlinger removed the part of the bill that would have reduced the amount of foreign owned ag land allowed in Missouri from 1% to 1-half-of-a-percent. He says that will be a stand-alone bill.

 

The post Missouri Ag Bill advances appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Illinois Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy


h2013_Illinois_cornThe Illinois Farm Bureau reminds farmers they have until midnight this Saturday, January 24th, to comment on the Illinois Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy. The IFB says it supports the plan because it uses education, outreach and voluntary, incentive-based best management practices for addressing nutrient losses from Illinois farm fields.

The goal of the plan is to reduce nutrient losses to improve Illinois water quality and the quality of water leaving the state and entering the Gulf of Mexico.

IFB is a founding member of the Illinois Council on Best Management Practices (C-BMP), a coalition of agribusinesses and agricultural organizations.

Illinois Farm Bureau – comment link

The post Illinois Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: January 23, 2015


Futures Markets copy
Mar. corn closed at $3.86 and 3/4, up 3 cents
Mar. soybeans closed at $9.72 and 3/4, down 4 cents
Mar. soybean meal closed at $331.50, up $1.40
Mar. soybean oil closed at 31.60, down 37 points
Mar. wheat closed at $5.30, down 3 and 3/4 cents
Feb. live cattle closed at $150.35, down $3.00
Feb. lean hogs closed at $69.30, down $2.30
Mar. crude oil closed at $45.59, down 72 cents
Mar. cotton closed at 57.30, down 46 points
Feb. Class III milk closed at $14.98, up 22 cents
Feb. gold closed at $1,292.60, down $8.10
Dow Jones Industrial Average: 17,672.60, down 141.38 points

The post Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: January 23, 2015 appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Cattle placements down 8%


ChampionHill_2011 Ohio Cattlemen's Roundup 022 (5)

USDA reports cattle placements onto feed and marketings during December 2014 were below December 2013 levels, reflecting the continued tight available supply of cattle.

Placements were 1.544 million head, down 8% on the year, and according to Allendale, the smallest December total in at least five years. By weight, placements of cattle weighing less than 600 pounds were 435,000 head and placements of 600 to 699 pound cattle were 375,000 head, while 700 to 799 pound placements were 339,000 head and placements of cattle weighing 800 pounds and heavier were 395,000 head.

Marketings came out at 1.655 million head, 5% less than last year.

The total number of cattle on feed on January 1 was 10.690 million head, up 1% from a year ago, with the steer and steer calf inventory up 2% at 6.94 million head and the heifer and heifer calf inventory down 2% at 3.67 million head.

Other disappearances were 72,000 head, a 6% decline.

The numbers look slightly friendly for cattle futures.

The post Cattle placements down 8% appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Strickler inducted into Hall of Fame


Ohio State Fair logo

Ohio State Fair General Manager Virgil Strickler has been inducted into the Ohio Fairs Hall of Fame.

Strickler, the Ohio State Fair’s longest running general manager was recognized for his devotion and invaluable service to the Ohio fair industry and for revolutionizing the youth education and livestock program during his time at the Ohio State Fair.

Inducted along with Strickler during the 90th annual Ohio Fair Managers Association Convention were William “Bill” Fulmer of the Ashland County Fair, Keith Sheridan of the Greene County Fair and Paul G. Oechsle of the Van Wert County Fair.

The post Strickler inducted into Hall of Fame appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Dairy Calf and Heifer Association scholarship


Print

The Dairy Calf and Heifer Association (DCHA) is now accepting applications for its annual scholarship program. The goal of this long-standing program is to invest in the future of the dairy industry by offering scholastic support to outstanding agriculture-focused students.

The annual DCHA scholarship is awarded to a student currently enrolled in agriculture-related field at an accredited college or university. Applicants must have completed at least one year of post-high school education. A person may receive the scholarship only once, and must meet the following requirements for consideration.

To apply for the scholarship, applicants must:

·        Be a member of DCHA, or the son, daughter or legal dependent of a DCHA member

·        Have completed at least one year of post-high school education

·        Be attending an accredited college or university

·        Be enrolled in a field of agriculture (e.g. dairy science, animal/veterinary science, agricultural technical course, ag communications, etc.) or in a course of study with relevance to agriculture; preference given to dairy calf and heifer related fields

To download a copy of the application, go to: http://bit.ly/1yIY9C8

Applications must be postmarked by Friday, Feb. 20, 2015 and can be emailed to: info@calfandheifer.org or mailed to: P.O. Box 1752, Madison, WI 53701.

The post Dairy Calf and Heifer Association scholarship appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Marketing year high for corn exports


Futures Markets copy

USDA reports corn, wheat, and soybean meal export sales for the week ending January 15 were larger than expected, while soybean oil was within the anticipated range and soybeans were below all estimates. Physical shipments of soybeans were above what’s needed weekly to meet USDA projections for the 2014/15 marketing year, but corn and wheat were short of their respective marks.

Wheat came out at 458,400 tons (16.8 million bushels), up 61% from the week ending January 8 and 69% higher than the four week average. Unknown destinations purchased 92,000 tons and the Philippines bought 80,600 tons. At this point in the 2014/15 marketing year, wheat sales are 712.6 million bushels, compared to 929.9 million in 2013/14. Sales of 106,000 tons (3.9 million bushels) for 2015/16 delivery were mainly to the Philippines (60,000 tons).

Corn exports were a new marketing year high at 2,185,400 tons (86.0 million bushels), considerably larger than the previous week and the four week average. Unknown destinations picked up 483,700 tons and Japan purchased 426,300 tons. So far this marketing year, corn sales are 1.195 billion bushels, compared to 1.168 billion this time last year.

Soybean exports were a new marketing year low at 14,100 tons (500,000 bushels), a 99% drop from the week before and a decline of 98% from the four week average. Russia bought 83,200 tons and the Netherlands picked up 77,000 tons, but unknown destinations canceled on 413,800 tons. For the marketing year to date, soybean sales are 1.629 billion bushels, compared to 1.546 billion a year ago. Sales of 101,200 tons (3.7 million bushels) for 2015/16 delivery were primarily to unknown destinations (100,000 tons).

Soybean meal was reported at 284,500 tons, a steep increase from both the prior week and the four week average. Spain purchased 74,000 tons and Colombia bought 49,900 tons, while unknown destinations canceled on 38,100 tons. Cumulative soybean meal sales for the current marketing year are 7,755,400 tons, compared to 6,695,000 last year. Sales of 6,100 tons for 2015/16 delivery were to unknown destinations (6,000 tons) and Canada (100 tons).

Soybean oil was pegged at 17,700 tons, down 42% on the week and 22% lower than the four week average. Peru picked up 7,600 tons and the Dominican Republic bought 5,800 tons. 2014/15 soybean oil sales are 506,500 tons, compared to 433,300 in 2013/14.

Net beef sales totaled 9,600 tons. The listed purchasers were South Korea (2,400 tons), Mexico (2,100 tons), Hong Kong (1,900 tons), Canada (700 tons), and Taiwan (700 tons).

Net pork sales totaled 23,900 tons. The reported buyers were Mexico (11,200 tons), South Korea (5,700 tons), Canada (3,300 tons), Japan (1,600 tons), and Hong Kong (600 tons).

The post Marketing year high for corn exports appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Midday cash livestock markets


Other than a few bids on cattle in Iowa at 255.00, the country was quiet on Friday morning following a light trade in parts of the South on Thursday at mostly 160.00. A light trade took place in the North on Tuesday and Wednesday at 256.00 to 257.00, mostly 256.00. Asking prices on the few cattle left on the showlists are around 162.00 plus in the South and 260.00 plus in the North.

Boxed beef cutout values in the morning report are mixed with the choice beef down 1.77 at 253.88, and select is .54 higher at 249.43.

Feeder cattle receipts a Missouri auctions totaled 47,906 head this week. Compared to last week, feeder steers and heifers sold mostly 5.00 to 15.00 lower. A few cases of closer to steady money were noted mostly on lighter weight cattle, which would be suitable for grass in the coming months. This however was the exception, as the majority of cattle sold at lower levels. Heavy weight cattle, which have fewer days left before finishing, felt the most pressure as futures markets continued a downward slide. Feeder steers, medium and large 1 averaging 621 pounds brought 248.64 per hundredweight. 624 pound heifers averaged 219.83.

Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota, Western, and Eastern direct trade are not reported due to confidentiality. Nationally the live market is .57 lower from 52.00 to 54.50. Missouri direct base carcass meat price is steady from 62.00 to 65.00.

The pork carcass cutout value is .99 lower at 83.71 FOB plant.

The monthly cold storage report released yesterday inventoried more frozen pork and beef than most anticipated 497.1 million pounds of pork as of December 31 versus an average guess of 483.5 million.

The post Midday cash livestock markets appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

Mild weather for the season across the Heartland


Across the Corn Belt, mild weather prevails, although freezing rain is causing some travel difficulties in the upper Great Lakes region. Dry weather covers the remainder of the Midwest.

On the Plains, mild weather from Kansas northward contrasts with cool conditions and lingering clouds farther south. A few rain and snow showers are ongoing across central Texas. The southern Plains’ precipitation, which began January 21, has slowed final cotton harvest efforts but aided rangeland, pastures, and winter wheat.

In the South, widespread rain is curtailing outdoor activities but helping to ease pockets of lingering dryness. Some of the heaviest rain is pushing across the Southeast, including southern Georgia and northern Florida.

In the West, dry weather has returned to the southern Rockies, following beneficial snowfall. Dry weather covers the remainder of the region, except for a few showers in the Pacific Northwest. California is starting to brace for a fourth year of drought due to anemic snowpack and near-record January dryness.

Morning Low Temperature Plot

Weather Alerts

Forecast High Temperatures (National)

 

The post Mild weather for the season across the Heartland appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

An active pattern resumes across the eastern Corn Belt


A storm system near the central Gulf Coast will drift northeastward, reaching the Mid-Atlantic Coast on Saturday. Wintry precipitation (snow and freezing rain) may cause travel disruptions from western North Carolina to coastal New England, while rainfall could reach 1 to 3 inches along the Atlantic Seaboard. By early next week, a new storm will dive southeastward from the upper Mississippi Valley into the Mid-Atlantic States, generating widespread snow. Mostly dry weather will prevail elsewhere, except for light rain and snow showers in parts of the West early next week. Meanwhile, an overall mild pattern will be replaced by sharply colder conditions in the eastern U.S. Although no freezes are expected in Florida’s citrus belt, temperatures could drop below 40° next week in northern production areas. In addition, sub-zero temperatures should occur on January 27-28 as far south as Pennsylvania. In stark contrast, early-week temperatures could approach 70° as far north as Montana’s High Plains.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for the likelihood of above-normal temperatures from the Pacific Coast to the Plains, while colder-than-normal conditions east of the Mississippi River. Meanwhile, below-normal precipitation in the Northwest and from the Mississippi River to the East Coast will contrast with wetter-than-normal weather across much of the Plains and Southwest.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

 

The post An active pattern resumes across the eastern Corn Belt appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Subscribe To This Feed

California rains not enough


CaliforniaDrought_012315

Although rains have reached parts of California, drought concerns still remain. December rains brought hope that the three-year drought would end. But, the U.S. Drought Monitor says two and five inches of rain fell on a small part of northwestern California this week and the rest of the state is dry.

Agriculture in California will continue to feel the negative effects.  The state is near the halfway point of its rainy season.

 

The post California rains not enough appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.

     
Poll
How long do you see the Cavaliers sticking with David Blatt as their head coach?
Before the All Star game
Not until next season starts
Before the end of the season
Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)
Name:
Email:
Your email address is never published.
View Results

Weather

Tri-County Broadcasting

 

LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services